While, the newly elected President of United States of America Donald Trump was giving a speech that lasted for 20 minutes, here in India found his speech reminiscent of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s speeches and stances post his election victory in 2014. Trump largely spoke of ushering in an era of nationalism and populism.

We have found almost seven similarities in Trump and Modi’s speech.

India First

To remind you, Modi, in 2013, while speaking to the Indian-American community in the US through a video conference, he defined secularism as India First.

“Whatever you do, wherever you work, India should be the top priority for all its citizens”, said Modi.

Three years later, Donald Trump in his first speech as US President, he said somewhat similar narrative.

“From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first,” Trump said.

Make In India

Modi in his ‘nation first’ agenda, has initiated two initiative in particular – Make in India and Startup India – and he somehow managed to convert the former into a nationwide mantra to a large extent.

“This is the best time ever to be in India. And it is even better to Make in India,” saying this he concluded his speech at the launch of the initiative.

Trump’s speech on Friday, read a lot this one. Outlining the strategy of his government, the new US President declared, “We will follow two simple rules; buy American and hire American,” to a huge round of applause.

Acche Din

When it became clear that Modi had a landslide victory at the election, he delivered a victory speech to a crowd in Vadodara, where he ended it with chanting his election campaign mantra – acche din aa rahe hain (good days are coming).

Trump in his inaugural speech, made a similar chant such as ‘good’ days — rather ‘great days’ making a comeback for America which formed the bedrock for Trump’s election campaign. He said, “Together, we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And yes, together we will make America great again.”

Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas

In the same speech at Vadodara, Modi talked campaigned for inclusive growth by reaffirming BJP’s “sabka saath, sabka vikas” approach. “It is our responsibility to take everyone along. A government cannot be of just a few people,” he said.

A similar sentiment reverberated through Trump’s inaugural speech. “… to all Americans in every city near and far, small and large, from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words. You will never be ignored again,” he said seconds before concluding his first speech as the US President.

Fighting terror

The fight against terror was one of the chief talking points of Modi during his campaign trail and immediately after his election win. And clearly, the case was the same for Trump.

“We will reinforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilised world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate from the face of the Earth,” he said during the inaugural.

Attacking previous governments

Throughout his 2014 campaign, Modi criticised past government — especially the Congress government — for caring more for its own interests than those of the country. His statements ranged from “Punish the ‘Maa-Beta’ government that has ruined the country,” to “our mindset is nationalism, their mindset is politics is everything.”

Trump didn’t shy away from criticising his predecessors either. ” The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country. Their victories have not been your victories. Their triumphs have not been your triumphs. And while they celebrated in our nation’s capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land,” he said.

People’s government

One of the very first comments Modi made after his election victory was – “The government belongs to all the people of the country, from Kashmir to Kanyakumari, from Kutch to Kamrup.”

And the flavour of Trump’s speech was pretty much the same. “Today’s ceremony has very special meaning because of today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from Washington DC and giving it back to you, the people,” he said.